Brad Simpson, Senior Environmental, Health & Safety Manager, at an Invenergy wind site in Texas.

United States military veterans make up more than 10 percent of Invenergy’s workforce. We deeply value the mission-driven dedication and technical expertise that military veterans contribute to our company. Many of our veterans consider their work in the energy industry as a continuation of their service, safeguarding the nation by protecting and maintaining our energy security.

To promote the important role veterans play in energy fields, Invenergy is proud to be a presenting sponsor for Veteran’s Energy Seminar, a national program committed to educating about global energy security challenges and inspiring continued service through careers in the energy industry, policy and entrepreneurship. In December 2017, Invenergy sponsored and hosted the first-ever Veteran’s Energy Seminar event in Chicago, and this year we’re excited to see the organization expand its reach. In 2018, Veterans Energy Seminar events will be taking place in five cities across the U.S., including in Chicago at Invenergy’s headquarters building on August 30.

If you are a veteran, reservist, military spouse, or energy professional interested in supporting career opportunities for veterans, we hope you will sign up to attend one of the upcoming Veterans Energy Seminar events in Chicago, San Diego, Boston, Washington, D.C, or Las Vegas.

Veterans support Invenergy’s business in many occupational specialties—development, origination, asset management, operations, safety and more. Two Invenergy military veterans shared their stories and perspectives on why energy careers are appealing to veterans: 

Ted Romaine, Vice President of Origination

Ted joined Invenergy in 2015 and is based out of our Chicago headquarters office. He co-leads sales and marketing activities focused on new and existing commercial and industrial customers.

I was a Civil Engineer in the Air Force and began at Hill Air Force Base in Utah where I managed energy savings performance contracts and energy procurement for the base. I worked with steam and cogeneration plants and all sorts of steam distribution systems. I also attended a graduate civil engineering program at the University of Colorado that focused on building renewable energy and HVAC systems.
When I separated from the Air Force in 2007, I joined Johnson Controls in Wisconsin to work on energy efficiency. There, I joined the newly created renewable energy team to develop solar PV and solar thermal projects, including PPAs. In 2013, I joined an internal start-up that deployed lithium-ion storage solutions. And in 2015, I started at Invenergy, a company entirely dedicated to clean energy development.
I think the energy industry is appealing to veterans for a number of reasons. The one I hear most frequently from other veterans is that there is a sense of purpose and meaning to the work we do—that we can connect the dots from our everyday jobs to a larger vision to help transform our energy supply. For some, it’s about energy security; for others, it’s about tackling the threat of global climate change. In both cases, it’s about knowing that we are making a difference and contributing to something we believe in. Additionally, the energy industry is incredibly dynamic these days, experiencing rapid change around technology improvements, regulatory adjustments and new business models. It’s an arena where you must think strategically and tactically, absorb a lot of information and make quick decisions. In those respects, there are a lot of similarities to military service.

Brad Simpson, Senior Environmental, Health & Safety Manager

Brad joined Invenergy in 2009 and is based at our Turkey Track Wind Energy Center in Texas. He is responsible for overseeing the Environmental, Health & Safety (EHS) matters during construction, operations and maintenance at operating wind and natural gas energy centers in Texas and South America.

I served 20+ years in the United States Air Force in many roles across the nation and world: maintaining and managing aviation and munitions support systems, ensuring the maintainability and reliability of B-1 aircraft, and as an aircraft and egress systems quality assurance inspector. I earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Professional Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, with focus on occupational safety and health and management.  I retired at the rank of E-7, Master Sergeant. An Invenergy manager encouraged me to apply for the safety manager position before I officially retired from the Air Force, and I joined Invenergy shortly after retiring.
My military career required technical proficiency and performance with a high level of autonomy. Moreover, it required significant resource, personnel, and program management skills, many of which I’ve used at Invenergy. In the Air Force, I deployed to bases around the world and worked alongside a diverse and international group of people. As an Invenergy employee, I’ve had similar opportunities to do the same in the United States and Canada. 
Lastly, in the Air Force, I supported fighter and bomber combat aircraft along with cargo aircraft and associated support systems. Like Invenergy, safety was always the priority during Air Force operations, which made my transition feel seamless. Invenergy’s commitment to veterans is evident and seen in the number of veterans on staff and the support the company provides. For example, Invenergy supported me and my involvement in its partnership with the Truman National Security Project for Operation Free, a veteran-led initiative that advocates for veteran activism on oil independence and climate change. It’s important to me that Invenergy continues to support and hire veterans, and I hope Invenergy continues to be a model for other energy companies.

Because of the role that veterans like Ted and Brad have in building a more secure, safer and cleaner energy future, Invenergy is proud to support Veteran’s Energy Seminar’s work in encouraging service men and women to join the energy industry after leaving the military.

To learn more or to sign up to join us, please visit the Veteran’s Energy Seminar website.